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EPS Young Minds at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light

By & . Published on 20 December 2013 in:
December 2013, News, , ,

Students at the Autumn Academy at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Lights
Students at the Autumn Academy at the Max Planck
Institute for the Science of Light

The second Autumn Academy at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light took place from 30 September to 2 October 2013. The aim of this two-and-a-half day event was to introduce Bachelor and Master students to the fast moving field of optical sciences including topics such as quantum information processing, meta-materials, nano-optics, photonic crystal fibres, nonlinear optics, imaging and sensing. The response was excellent. From more than 70 applications, the EPS Young Minds section of Erlangen, Germany selected 26 students and invited them to Erlangen for a packed schedule.

The participants received an overview over the wide range of research fields covered by the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light [MPL] at the poster session that was organised on the first evening.

In the course of the Academy, the participants attended several lectures given both by the Institute‚Äôs directors Prof. Gerd Leuchs, Prof. Vahid Sandoghdar and Prof. Philip Russell, by PhD students and group leaders from the MPL and also by the invited lecturers Prof. Florian Marquardt (Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg), Prof. Cornelia Denz (University of Münster) and Dr. Jonathan Matthews (University of Bristol). The lectures addressed a wide variety of topics ranging from photonic crystal fibres over nano – and biophotonics to optomechanics to name only a few of them.

Between the lectures several laboratory tours were offered, that allowed the participants to learn about the actual experimental implementations of the research presented in the lectures.




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